April 11

Our Executive Is Missing: Kidnap and Ransom Basics for Security Professionals-Part I | ETS Risk Management


The first of a three-part series to help protective professionals understand how K&R can be successfully resolved.


Preparing for the worse is part of every security professional’s repertoire especially when it comes to planning for failure. This three-part series is designed to enhance understanding of how kidnap and ransom negotiations work and your role in the event the unthinkable happens. Cyber Security leaders with a significant global high-risk footprint know that a kidnapping may not be a question of “if” but a question of “when”. It may happen when you are not directly responsible for covering your employee or their family and therefore least able to prevent it – when they are alone and most vulnerable. Learning what to expect in those first hours of an abduction will help you avoid becoming a bystander when your leadership is most needed.


Kidnap 101:


Kidnapping is a significant weapon of influence and source of funding for criminals and terrorists from South America to Southeast Asia to Africa. Kidnapping is the unlawful seizure and detention of a person usually for a ransom. That latter part of the definition, “usually for a ransom”, is the beacon of light the skilled negotiator homes in on and exploits to accomplish the mission – the safe release of the victim.


The international kidnap phenomenon is a “good news, bad news” scenario. The bad news – Kidnapping is a burgeoning crime flourishing in countries where police and prosecutors are unable or unwilling to address it. Consequently, the kidnapper perceives his plans as low risk, high gain. The good news – The captor’s motivation in most kidnappings, is money. The kidnapper’s purpose is monetary rather than bringing harm to the hostage. Therefore, hostages retain their value when they remain alive. This critical dynamic provides the negotiator with the leverage and influence needed to liberate the hostage.


Cyber Security


Although money remains far and away the most common kidnap motivation, political demands including publicity, release of prisoners and welfare items have also been used as ransom criteria. Nigerian groups have taken hostages to force oil companies to provide economic assistance to local villagers. Journalist Danny Pearl was taken to pressure the Pakistan government not to support the U.S. In all cases, the kidnapper’s goal is to force a third party to do something; usually to pay money. Holding the hostage and threatening harm empowers the kidnapper. Nevertheless, victim companies and families have control and influence since they control what the kidnapper wants – money. The overriding theme a negotiator messages is; “If you harm the hostage you won’t get what you want.”


The Early Hours:


The initial stages of a kidnap are marked by both limited and conflicting information. You will normally have more questions than answers when your employee’s whereabouts are unknown. You may be nowhere near your protectee nor responsible for their welfare when you get a call indicating they or their family member are missing. Therefore, your priority must be to confirm that a kidnapping truly occurred.  Event Security professionals who maintain viable tracking and locator technology enjoy a significant advantage here. Immediately engage a pre-selected K&R professional, who you or your company have already vetted. These professionals often come out of federal law enforcement or specialized firms and are extensively trained in crisis negotiations. Your consultant should be able to demonstrate dozens of successful resolutions to ransom, extortion and barricaded subject scenarios. Next, prepare for the worse-case scenario by planning for the abductor’s initial call.  Next, assist the consultant, your company and the employee’s family to decide who should take the initial ransom call.


The Communicator:


As a protective professional you should have a crisis management plan that includes a K&R response protocol. Part of that protocol should be an understanding that if a kidnap occurs, a K&R consultant will want to select a communicator to engage with the captor. The role of the communicator is that of a mouthpiece for the victim family or company and to act as a conduit to the kidnapper. The communicator has limited authority and must project subordination to the final decision makers when conversing with the captors. Adherence to company or family objectives and gathering accurate information are important aspects of the communicator’s duties.


When helping to select a communicator remember that the person must be: Willing to accept coaching; Loyal to your client’s company and its policies; Emotionally stable; and, an excellent listener. The communicator is not a debater but more of an influencer and persuader who conveys honesty and resolve while trying to avoid confrontation.


The ability of the communicator to maintain a low key, calm and patient business-like demeanor is imperative. One of the communicator’s key tasks is to establish a window of contact with the kidnapper. The communicator can exert a degree of control and minimize the necessity of being continuously available by arranging a specific time frame for contacts with the captors. If the captor attempts to make contact outside of the arranged time, the communicator must not acknowledge the contact thereby using a classical conditioning approach to influence the captor to abide by the agreement.


Prior to a scheduled contact the communicator will prepare and rehearse under the supervision of a trained K&R negotiator. Objectives are set out for each contact. The communicator must be prepared to play both defense and offense. The communicator will be coached on how to respond (defense) to anticipated topics the captor may broach. At the same time, the communicator will be armed with three or four key points (offense) to work into the conversation. The conversation will be scripted with key words and phrases prominently posted on situation boards in the negotiation operations center (NOC). You can facilitate this operation by acquiring and securing a NOC that is quiet and convenient for all.


Once a decision is made as to where and to whom the initial call will be directed the key messages must be readied. Your K&R professional will help draft a message for the company or family that is designed to convey three things to the captor: 1) A willingness to communicate; 2) The need for proof of possession/proof of life; and 3) A requirement for a reasonable delay. You should prepare the communicator for what’s coming – A high financial demand, a deadline, threats, and a warning to not involve law enforcement.


Up next: The second article in this series will address interaction with law enforcement, families, and the media.


Contact Us to speak with our Subject Matter Expert Kidnap and Ransom Consultancy Team


The original article was first published by Security Magazine


About the authors


Steve Romano and Frank Figliuzzi help lead ETS Risk Management, Inc. They consult with global clients on Crisis Negotiations, Kidnap, and Workplace Violence. Steve was the FBI’s Chief Hostage Negotiator and a Vice President of Control Risks. Frank was the FBI’s Assistant Director for Counterintelligence and a Fortune 100 corporate security executive. Frank also works as a National Security Contributor for NBC News.


Click for Source


April 11

Media Security Services Department | ETS Risk Management

ETS work to enable media operations in complex environments. We regularly provide Media Security teams local trusted assets providing invaluable local knowledge and support (including vehicles, drivers, security, and fixers). Our high-level media security personnel stemming from specialist backgrounds and with extensive commercial experience of operating with Media teams provide organizations the confidence and ability to operate in challenging locations.

April 11

Why do ETS only utilize Tier One Operators for VIP Protection? | ETS Risk Management

Why does ETS select only former Special Forces and elite government unit personnel for full-time Executive Protection?

Former Special Forces (SF) operators are a natural fit for global executive protection. Formed from the core SF and Elite units such as SAS, Delta, SBS, SEALs, SRR, MI5, MI6, CIA, certain FBI groups, BOPE, DSGE and GIGN, they share the following characteristics and skillsets:

  • Ability to operate under high stress
  • Ability to operate with minimal support
  • Proven ability to work within close-knit teams with or without a formal hierarchy
  • Proven experience in dangerous environments
  • High-level stress induced training and real world stress proven
  • Low profile and covert operations experience lending itself to blending in
  • Nothing to prove and never looking to validate their role
  • Mutual respect for and regular interaction with other tier-one law enforcement and other agencies within their network of security professionals
  • Experience operating against the high-level terrorism, criminal and espionage targets

VIP Protection – Value and Skills

Operators cost millions of dollars to train but their true value comes from years of real-world assignments that shape and sharpen their skills, networks and instincts. Their proven unique experience facilitating secure travel and lifestyle in all environments without fanfare is their understated asset. VIPs chaperoned by world-class tier one operators can safely and efficiently move on foreign turf while remaining under the radar. Low profile, discreet and respectful, the former Special Forces operator is a proven and powerful enabler. A conscientious operator able to read the environment and quietly get the job done is an invaluable part of a VIP’s team.

VIP Security – Protection of Reputation as well as Physical Security

special event security

As seen repeatedly in the celebrity and corporate worlds, unprofessional personal security can inflict long-lasting reputational harm, or worse. There are multiple untold horror stories of VIP security gone wrong including personal security operators and drivers getting lost on the way to meetings, driving through high-risk environments, and having their VIPs attacked. There are examples of personal special event security negligently discharging firearms, crashing vehicles, and losing track of their protectee. Even less extreme failures have a serious negative impact on business effectiveness, brand reputation, and the personal image of the senior executive. Far too often those most in need of high-level security make the mistake of saving on cost in favor of ‘large, imposing bodyguards’ yet rarely consider if these persons have the training and ability to react.

Executive Protection – Experience is Key

Some Executive Protection businesses, even the largest ones, normally recruit from a pool of civilians, or minimally trained ex-armed forces willing to ‘train’ and accept low wages to become part of the ‘circuit’. These companies celebrate and laud their training programs, yet you can’t teach the skillsets and real-world experience of tier-one professionals in two weeks. Reaction instincts, and covert operations skills under high levels of risk and stress, simply can’t be developed in a hurry.

This is why ETS only uses Tier One personnel from its personal networks, only selecting personnel from the most elite units. It is only through this system that we can guarantee our clients the very best level of service.

For more detail Click Here

April 11

Our Executive Is Missing: Kidnap and Ransom Basics for Security Professionals – Part II | ETS Risk Management

The second of a three-part series to help protective professionals understand how K&R can be successfully resolved

It may happen when you are least able to prevent it – when your executive or his family are alone and most vulnerable. Learning what to expect in the hours and days after an abduction will help you avoid becoming a bystander at a time when your leadership is most needed. Understanding how professional negotiators work increases the odds that you will seek their expertise, augment their mission, and successfully resolve an abduction. The first article of this series focused on the early hours, activating your crisis plan, confirming a kidnapping has occurred, engaging an expert consultant, establishing a negotiation operations center, and carefully selecting a communicator to receive ransom calls. This second article in the series dives deeper into ransom negotiation techniques and financial criteria.

Financial Criteria:

One reason to seek the expertise of a K&R professional is domain knowledge regarding ransom. We are all familiar with the real estate mantra, “location, location, location”. Similarly, ransom demands are contingent upon the adversaries’ expectations, or the “going rate”, and a major determinant of that rate is location. A K&R expert will help you understand the most recent and differing ransom structures for places like Nigeria, Colombia and Mexico Executive Protection Services. Also obtain and assess intelligence regarding the captor’s previous kidnap track record, including the credibility of their threats and their propensity for violence, and what ransom amounts have been paid by western victims’ families and companies in that location. Such intelligence is instrumental in estimating the final amount you expect to pay the captors to secure the release of the hostage. Another key factor in deriving this payment figure is of course the amount of funds available and/or agreeable to be paid. Statistics show that a large majority of captors agree to approximately 10 percent of their initial ransom demand.

 Executive Protection Services

Your K&R consultant will insist the captors provide a bonafide proof of life before making the initial counteroffer. This serves to strengthen the continuous message that the payment of ransom is directly tied to the welfare of the victim. As a rule, the initial counteroffer to the captor’s first ransom demand should be about two-thirds of the amount you expect to pay. As in a chess game, a financial strategy can be employed that allows room to reach the final amount in several moves. Another general guideline is to not make the initial counteroffer until the kidnappers lower their initial demand. Then, increases should be made in decreasing increments. Also, offering odd amounts of money is a technique used to indicate your difficulty in raising funds. This tactic can be most effective when dealing with the kidnap of a family member.

Reaching a decision as to the initial counteroffer amount requires a balancing act. The amount should be high enough to insure the victim’s safety and not insult or anger the captors. If the captors perceive a lack of sincerity regarding the negotiation effort they may feel compelled to commit violence against the victim. Yet the initial counteroffer must also avoid inflating the adversary’s expectations.

Avoid the Double Dip

A professional negotiator also serves as a dispassionate objective party to avoid payment pitfalls. Regardless of the financial resources of the victim’s family or company avoid paying too much too soon. This mistake can easily result in what negotiators refer to as a “double dip.” A double dip occurs when an apparent ransom agreement reached by both sides turns into a down payment, a demand for more money, and a failure to release the victim. A basic behavioral principle may come into play during kidnap for ransom negotiations; People do not appreciate what they do not work hard to earn. If the captor obtains the ransom he asks for with little or no resistance, and in a relatively short period of time, he begins to experience buyer’s remorse. In other words, the captor perceives that getting his demand was too easy, he should have asked for more, and there must be a lot more money available.

The concept of prolonging a victim’s captivity by hastily agreeing to the captor’s ransom demand seems counterintuitive. It can be difficult to explain and convince a victim’s family that it is in the victim’s best interests to extend the negotiation process. The family’s only goal is to get their loved one back safely and as soon as possible. Understandably, some victim families confuse a ransom payment for release of their loved one with the process of buying a car. If a customer agrees to pay the sticker price on a car then the deal is done, the customer gets their car and the dealer gets his price. Unfortunately, bartering in human lives is fraught with critical nuances understood only by a professional negotiator as necessary to secure the safe return of the victim.

If you have not already incorporated kidnapping into your crisis plan and exercises, selected a professional consultant, nor exposed your C-Suite to K&R familiarization, now is the time.

Article Source url https://ets-riskmanagement.com/our-executive-is-missing-kidnap-and-ransom-basics-for-security-professionals-part-ii/

April 10

Expert Advice: Is It Safe To Go To Russia And To Attend The World Cup? | ETS Risk Management

Frank Figliuzzi is the Chief Operating Officer of ETS Risk Management, Inc., a global provider of travel security, Travel Risk Management, executive protection, threat intelligence and major event security. Frank is the former FBI Assistant Director of Counterintelligence, and recent head of Investigations, Special Event Security and Workplace Violence Prevention for General Electric.

How safe is it to visit Russia?

Virtually no travel to Russia is without risk.  Russia travel risk assessment is driven by three factors:

  1. Location specific inherent risks;
  2. The nature of the travel;
  3. and, The individual traveller.


Travel Risk Management


For example, hate crimes against foreigners, minorities, and the LGBT community occur in Russia because of an apparent tolerance for such conduct as reflected in weak legislative prohibitions and an unwillingness to prosecute. Deadly terror attacks happen in Moscow, the north Caucasus and, most recently, St. Petersburg because of long-standing organic ethnic, religious and regional strife such as the Chechen/Russian conflict including possible sympathies for ISIS within the Chechen region.

Travel in connection with special events or sporting matches raises the already well documented daily risk of tourists targeted by pickpockets and muggers, often by organized gangs in major cities. Individual travellers of Asian or Afro-Caribbean descent or who simply “don’t look like they belong” in the eyes of certain locals should exercise particularly enhanced vigilance.

Business travellers should understand that electronic devices are frequently targeted for intrusion via malware and other means in an attempt by the Russian intelligence services to access proprietary corporate information for a competitive edge.

Despite the inherent risks, travellers who make the effort to seek the “ground truth” of their destination through their own government alerts, reading current country risk profiles offered by established security firms, and who maintain vigilance and a low-profile, can easily mitigate the risks and enjoy a memorable trip to a vast and proud nation.

How safe will it be to go to the World Cup?

Travelers to the World Cup are advised of the significant risk posed by organized hooligans who seek to engage in brutal fights with opposing fans from countries like Britain, France and other nations.

Russian hooliganism is marked by elements distinct from traditional hooliganism in the UK and Europe. Law enforcement agencies with decades of experience in securing soccer competitions have documented observations of Russian thugs who are highly trained and prepared to fight. These hooligans physically train in body-building and fight techniques and they make a point of not drinking alcohol during matches to maintain an advantage over their UK or European counterparts.

Disturbingly, Russian government leaders seemingly encourage such behaviour with Russian Ministers quoted saying “Keep up the good work”, and Putin himself observing how Russian fans had quite literally beaten the English fans.

However, a major world event such as the World Cup is likely to be secured by the highest level of Russian national security agencies who understand the negative impact globally of any major incident during the World Cup.  The largely incident-free Winter Olympics in Sochi, even under threat of terrorism, is evidence that Russian can secure a major event when it chooses.

What are the biggest risks?

Opportunistic crimes such as pick-pocketing and other thefts are common in major Russian cities. This risk includes theft from hotel rooms and theft from vehicles. Cases are well-documented of visitors whose drinks were spiked at bars for the purpose of robbery, rape or other violence. Unconscious victims are often left outside sometimes with life-threatening implications especially in the cold winter months. Further reports exist of criminals impersonating police officers for the purpose of harassing and robbing tourists.

What are the overlooked risks?

Travellers to Russia often overlook or dismiss the reality that the Russian government is in near total control of infrastructure which facilitates intelligence service targeting of western business and government travellers to include remote intrusion into their devices, or, even outright theft of their laptops, smart phones and other devices.

Similarly, hotel frequented by western travellers are particularly notorious for intelligence collection, entrapment and attempts to compromise western business and government visitors. This fact poses a dilemma for travellers seeking to avoid such targeting by possibly choosing a local, non-westernized hotel.

However, such a choice often increases the odds of opportunistic crimes such as theft or assault and can antagonize the intelligence services who may become perturbed by your diversion from the usual hotel chains.

How should people mitigate this?

Risk mitigation remains similar to advice given for most international travel.

Specifically, avoid open display of wealth, including expensive jewellery, and anything that may identify you as a tourist. Avoid walking alone at night. Be vigilant for pickpockets in main tourist areas and around the main railway stations, and keep your passport tightly secured. Always buy your own drinks at the bar and keep them in sight at all times.

To mitigate the risk of being victimized by “fake” police officers, always insist on seeing identification if you are stopped.

What duty of care provisions should employers sending staff to Russia have in place? What should employees ask for?

Business leaders sending employees to Russia are advised to include professional risk management measures into the travel plan.

These measures should include physical security guidance, protection of intellectual property, and potential medical consultation and even evacuation. The addition of enhanced security enables your team to focus on business objectives within minimal constraints or distractions.  Employees should ask for loaner devices to take that contain only the data needed for that trip and bring a reliable communication device.

Employees traveling for lengthy periods, particularly to more remote areas of Russia, should understand that the local hospital blood supply may not be screened for HIV and other diseases as is the standard in the US, UK and other nations. Therefore, employees should ask about medical evacuation plans in the event of an unexpected need for surgery.

Read Full article on http://www.safetravelsmagazine.com/2018/03/26/expert-advice-is-it-safe-to-go-to-russia-and-to-attend-the-world-cup/

April 03

Why do ETS only utilize Tier One Operators for VIP Protection? | ETS Risk Management

Operators cost millions of dollars to train but their true value comes from years of real-world assignments that shape and sharpen their skills, networks and instincts. Their proven unique experience facilitating secure travel and lifestyle in all environments without fanfare is their understated asset. VIPs chaperoned by world-class tier one operators can safely and efficiently move on foreign turf while remaining under the radar. Low profile, discreet and respectful, the former Special Forces operator is a proven and powerful enabler. A conscientious operator able to read the environment and quietly get the job done is an invaluable part of a VIP protection team.

April 03

Protective Surveillance White Paper | ETS Risk Management

Identifying threats early is vital to ensure time to react. If one has time to react then the chances of a favorable outcome are increased dramatically. Any aggressive force normally has the advantage of surprise. The attack occurs on their terms. Very few aggressors will attack if they don’t feel they have the upper hand, they do so at a time of their choosing, and probably after extensive planning and preparation.

The assassination of Denis N. Voronenkov in March 2017, a former Russian lawmaker who was killed in Kiev in a widely publicized killing, identifies what happens when Media Security does not have time to react. Denis Voronenkov, who’d been a Communist member of Russia’s lower legislative house before he left, was fatally shot outside a hotel in broad daylight. The assassin walked up behind the target and his personal security, then shot Voronenkov, after which a gunfight ensued and both Assassin and security were shot, and the VIP left dead.

There is an increased chance that a PST would have identified the threat early, communicated with the CPT and been able to pre-empt the attack, or intercept.

April 03

Cyber Security Risk Management | ETS Risk Management

Preparing for the worse is part of every security professional’s repertoire especially when it comes to planning for failure. This three-part series is designed to enhance understanding of how kidnap and ransom negotiations work and your role in the event the unthinkable happens. Cyber Security leaders with a significant global high-risk footprint know that a kidnapping may not be a question of “if” but a question of “when”. It may happen when you are not directly responsible for covering your employee or their family and therefore least able to prevent it – when they are alone and most vulnerable. Learning what to expect in those first hours of an abduction will help you avoid becoming a bystander when your leadership is most needed.

April 03

What are the Armored Vehicle Ratings? | ETS Risk Management

Are you considering utilizing an armored vehicle? Perhaps you are heading to an area of increased risk and want to understand more about Armored Vehicles, or are considering Armored Vehicle Rental.

There are two main primary standards used to rate armor – The NIJ and the EN standard.

The NIJ (the U.S body) is considered the world leader for ballistic testing for armor, they perform a full range of tests and provide details of the results in their armor standards. These show the range of protection offered by the different pieces of armor tested, from low powered handguns, up to armor piercing rifle rounds. They provide 8 classifications of protection known as threat levels which are Class I, IIA, II, IIIA, III, IV, V & VI.


April 03

Our Executive Is Missing: Kidnap and Ransom Basics for Security Professionals (Part Iii) | ETS Risk Management


A company should prepare to expend a considerable amount of time and resources supporting, advising and protecting the victim family. First impressions are critical, and a company should give serious consideration as to which executive protection level official will make the initial in-person notification, and who will be assigned as the full-time family liaison for the duration of the incident. The victim’s family will feel isolated, perceive that information is being filtered, and that the company is not doing enough to obtain their loved one’s release. These sentiments are quite common and understandable. It is essential for the company to form a united front with the family and to provide them with realistic assessments and genuine assurances that they are equal players at the table.

As soon as possible there are two areas to address with the family. The first area is how to handle contact with the captors. The second topic involves the best approach to media inquiries. Contact from the captors with the family is very common and should be expected. Captors realize the emotional impact they can have when they manipulate victim family against victim company. They know the family can pressure the company to quickly acquiesce to the captor’s demands. A company that provides the victim family with concrete guidelines can minimize the likelihood of orchestrated manipulation. Additionally, the family’s confidence in the company’s knowledge and competence increases when they can anticipate the adversaries’ strategy.


March 28

Why do ETS only utilize Tier One Operators for VIP Protection? | ETS Risk Management

Operators cost millions of dollars to train but their true value comes from years of real-world assignments that shape and sharpen their skills, networks and instincts. Their proven unique experience facilitating secure travel and lifestyle in all environments without fanfare is their understated asset. VIPs chaperoned by world-class tier one operators can safely and efficiently move on foreign turf while remaining under the radar. Low profile, discreet and respectful, the former Special Forces operator is a proven and powerful enabler. A conscientious operator able to read the environment and quietly get the job done is an invaluable part of a VIP protection team.

March 28

Insider Threat A Beginners Guide | ETS Risk Management

What your company spent years to develop can be lost in an instant at the hands of one bad intentioned employee. The statistics on employee theft of intellectual property (IP) paint a dark portrait of what employees do when disgruntled, moving on, or stockpiling for a rainy day. William Evanina, the U.S. government’s National Counterintelligence Executive in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence says, “As a corporate leader, the single most important investment in protecting your proprietary information and sensitive trade secrets is developing a viable and enterprise-wide insider threat programs”.

To paraphrase the well-worn mantra on hacking and apply it to the pandemic of Insider Threat: There are two types of companies, those whose employees have already stolen IP, and those who simply don’t know it yet.  No matter where your company is along its journey toward an effective insider threat program, success or failure is measured by the last harmful egress of research, formulas, algorithms,  strategies, service manuals, or other critical business information (CBI). Whether your effort to detect, deter, and prevent CBI loss has become an industry model or is still a nascent vision, three common components can help build a new plan or help review and adapt a mature program.


March 28

Workplace Violence, A Stewardship Model Solution | ETS Risk Management

Reporting methods should be communicated to employees in numerous ways. These include posters in break-rooms, email reminders, and intranet home page links to a reporting tool. Small banks in particular, where “everybody knows everyone,” might want to offer an external contact number for reporting. Perhaps a community mental health center or your Employee Assistance Program vendor can partner in this endeavor.

Once employees report a concern, the ball is in management’s court. An effective WPV program includes a strong protocol to address reporting in a professional, credible, and timely manner. If employees perceive that their reports are not taken seriously, you may never receive another report.

Assemble a workplace violence Programs council including your HR leader, legal advisor, and security director, and preferably, a mental-health professional. Keep the team contact numbers in your smartphone to quickly convene a meeting.

March 27

Protective Surveillance White Paper | ETS Risk Management

The assassination of Denis N. Voronenkov in March 2017, a former Russian lawmaker who was killed in Kiev in a widely publicized killing, identifies what happens when Media Security does not have time to react. Denis Voronenkov, who’d been a Communist member of Russia’s lower legislative house before he left, was fatally shot outside a hotel in broad daylight. The assassin walked up behind the target and his personal security, then shot Voronenkov, after which a gunfight ensued and both Assassin and security were shot, and the VIP left dead.

There is an increased chance that a PST would have identified the threat early, communicated with the CPT and been able to pre-empt the attack, or intercept.


March 27

Our Executive is missing: Kidnap and Ransom Basics for Security Professionals – Part II | ETS Risk Management

One reason to seek the expertise of a K&R professional is domain knowledge regarding ransom. We are all familiar with the real estate mantra, “location, location, location”. Similarly, ransom demands are contingent upon the adversaries’ expectations, or the “going rate”, and a major determinant of that rate is location. A K&R expert will help you understand the most recent and differing ransom structures for places like Nigeria, Colombia and Mexico Executive Protection Services. Also obtain and assess intelligence regarding the captor’s previous kidnap track record, including the credibility of their threats and their propensity for violence, and what ransom amounts have been paid by western victims’ families and companies in that location. Such intelligence is instrumental in estimating the final amount you expect to pay the captors to secure the release of the hostage. Another key factor in deriving this payment figure is of course the amount of funds available and/or agreeable to be paid. Statistics show that a large majority of captors agree to approximately 10 percent of their initial ransom demand.