April 01

Safety Measures We Can Follow While Travelling

Many stories reach the public on how use of social media has helped travelers caught up in incidents when abroad – Twitter, Facebook and others have all ELearning travel safety individuals to rapidly share information with fellow travelers during security incidents and natural disasters. It is often the fastest way to get a picture of real time events unfolding from those closer to the incident.

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March 25

Is Safe For Solo Female Travelers? - Explore Secure

Is Safe For Solo Female Travelers? Why are females [...]

Is Safe For Solo Female Travelers?

Why are females more likely to be a victim of Criminal Attention?

The majority of criminals will try and focus on perceived ‘easy’ targets. It is generally assumed that women will not try and fight back and/or will be less able to defend themselves. Females are targeted more frequently because a majority of women carry purses or handbags which are much more accessible to criminals. In certain cultures, women are perceived as lower class citizens and therefore treated with less respect.

Why are females more likely being the victim of violence (to include sexual attack)?

A majority of violent attacks by men against women are often sexual in nature. Some motivations for these attacks stem from personal grievances, issues of control, and social disorders. Unfortunately motivations can also be purely opportunistic and deviant in nature. Therefore it is vital for one’s safety to eliminate these perceived ‘opportunities’ for criminals.

There are always going to be exceptions to the rules, but now that I have identified two main topics that put female travelers at higher risk let us now focus our efforts on eliminating these increased threats:

How can female travelers reduce the risk of being targeted by criminals and sexual predators?

Female travelers can adapt and minimize the chances of encountering threats. This is the underlying principal of travel safety. Identify the threat or danger early and prepare accordingly so as to minimize the risk. The trick is not to avoid travel, but simply to prepare and adapt to traveling as a female to maximize safety.

Female Travel Safety Advice

Certain risks hold true for both male and female travelers alike.

  • Vehicular incident
  • Criminal
  • Violent attack
  • Health issues and Disease
  • Beach related incidents e.g. rip currents
  • Fire – accommodations/nightclubs etc.

So what risks is Female Travel Safety more vulnerable to? I believe two risks that female travelers have an increased chance of falling victim to verses male counterparts are;

Know before you go

Research destinations and ask yourself the following question:

What are the main dangers of the country or cities that I will be visiting?

Crime, natural disasters, health issues and political instability are all things to consider. Though further research can provide more specific and current issues such as date rape drugs being utilized or a spate of recent muggings in certain locations. Study www.fco.gov.uk or www.smarttraveller.gov.au both great resources for travelers.

Time spent planning and preparing is never wasted. Don’t just look at the country but specifically at where you will be region, city and town. With knowledge comes power.

Know a bit more before you go

We cannot over emphasize the importance of knowledge. Research your destinations using commercial websites; interact on chat forums, advice pages and blogs. The websites www.lonelyplanet and www.bootsnall.com are great sources of information. Learn from others mistakes and experiences. If you have the time and inclination go onto travel forums and ask other travelers about what they experienced in the locations that you will visit.

Plan accordingly and commensurate with risk

List the main dangers you have found from your research in points 1 and 2 and then ask yourself one further question:

How can I minimize these risks?

It is not just identification of risks that’s important. Learning how to react accordingly is vital. Professionals in all industries train constantly for what may happen; it should be the same for emergency preparedness when traveling. Consider taking travel safety training. Click here to see our web-based travel safety e-learning briefing specifically designed for travelers and full of useful information about how to identify threats early to avoid danger.

Think Situational Awareness

We should never walk around with our head in the clouds. It is vital to be aware of our surroundings at all times, to scan for danger and analyze risks constantly. Often those injured or killed in active shooter, terrorist and other incidents or accidents are those slowest to react. Situational awareness and threat detection provide valuable seconds to react, therefore increasing the chances of survival.

Never switch off

At no times switch off situational awareness. Always look for escape routes; always look at who is watching you. Our  Female Travel Safety briefings teach how to learn and practice situational awareness and provide tricks of the trade to help keep you switched on.

Always wear a seatbelt

The biggest risks to travelers in foreign countries are vehicular accident. Even when on a bus, wear a seatbelt. There are many other risks related with transportation. Buses, trains, boats, rickshaws, mopeds all have a huge list of inherent risks associated to their use. Research and prepare, but whatever you do always wear that seatbelt. Never take chances with overland travel – it is the threat most likely to kill you!!

Be patient

If one is patient, polite and affable then life just goes so much smoother. With patience, comes the ability to put up with perceived rudeness, inefficiency, delays, corruption and a whole variety of things that as travelers we may not be accustomed too. With patience comes the ability to avoid conflict.

Smile

Just as the above point in number 7. If you are kind to people then 90% of the time they will reciprocate. You smile they will smile back, if you are nice, they will also be nice. This opens so many doors to a traveler, meeting people, learning about secret local spots off the beaten track, meals with kind strangers and a host of other great experiences that come from interacting and being nice. It also avoids conflict.

Check insurance

Insurance may cost money that you don’t think you can afford, but believe me – when you need it you will be glad you opted for it. Hospital bills and medical evacuation costs especially in more remote environments that you may find yourself in can easily reach into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. It may be as minimal as a twisted ankle on a Glacier trip, or appendicitis in Africa. Either of those could cost you thousands of dollars if you don’t have coverage. Check the small print over and over again of any insurance coverage. The insurance companies will not be flexible or heartfelt when it comes to paying out.

Learn first aid

Off the beaten track or on the road less traveled you may find yourself in medical and first aid situations. Being able to care for you, friends and colleagues can significantly increase chances of survival in times of extremis. Learning how to identify, prevent, treat or diagnose the basics such as heat illness, traveler’s diarrhea and mosquito borne diseases are extremely important. Other life saving skills such as CPR and hemorrhage control should also be considered, especially if traveling in remote environments. Consider taking a first aid course or at a minimum learning the basics prior to travel.

Female Travel Safety Summary

This is just a basic list of tips that will help you stay safe whilst traveling abroad. Travel safety and security is a huge topic and one with many variables and standpoints. Every traveler both male and female should prepare before traveling. There are threats everywhere that could affect travelers’ – men, women, individuals or groups alike. Should these potential dangers prevent us from traveling? Absolutely not! What these potential dangers should do is motivate us as individuals responsible for our own safety, to prepare accordingly and educate ourselves before we head out on our adventures.

Our innovative, user-friendly and online travel safety briefings designed by security professional from Special Forces and Counter-terrorist backgrounds is available.

March 19

online travel safety training A New Thought Process - Travel Security Training

Explore Secure to learn more about improving your [...]



Travel Risk Management & Travel Safety Elearning | Explore Secure

Road Traffic Collisions (RTC) is happening more frequently and is the number one cause of death to travellers worldwide.  A study by theWorld Health Organisation(WHO) identified on average 1.35 million people annually is losing their lives due to RTCs.  A long time ago the UK Police changed their terminology from Road Traffic Accident (RTA) to RTC because there is no such thing as a Road Traffic ‘Accident’ – there is always a cause or blame to assign.

Last month three charity workers were killed in South Africa as they travelled back to the airport.  Theirdriver lost controlof the vehicle and it ended upside-down in a river. Details are still unclear regarding the cause, but the outcome is one that is all too familiar. Travellers dying or being seriously injured as a result of incidents that could have been avoided.

The Biggest Danger to Travelers :

Ground transportation is the biggest danger to any traveller, yet one of the most neglected from a corporate and organisational perspective, and one that travellers are nearly always most relaxed about. Whether it is an assumption that taxis and rideshare services are safe, orthat seatbeltsdon’t need to be worn on coaches and buses, right through to lack of due diligence on drivers and vehicles assigned to travellers.

Take back control

Whether you are travelling for business or leisure, secure transportation should be considered as part of a robust travel risk management strategy. It’s important as an employer to have protection measures in place for your staff when they are travelling abroad. Employing a trusted secure transportation company is a strong start to improving the safety of your team while travelling on business.  If you are anindependent travelleror there are budget concerns, it is imperative that due diligence and a risk-based approach is implemented at each juncture.

Self-Drive?


Driving in an unfamiliar country can be stressful for many people, navigating around a busy town or city to find your hotel or meeting point, then trying to find parking is added pressure you don’t need. It also increasesyour risk significantly, not only due to the overarching threat of getting lost and taking a wrong turn into a dangerous area, or being involved in an accident, but also because of what may happen if stopped by the police. If you don’t speak the language and you can’t communicate, it’s quite possible a simple situation could escalate in the wrong direction quite quickly.
Taxi:  The next option is a taxi but how reliable or safe is the cab you are about to get into? The standards vary massively between locations. It is imperative to do research. For example, a taxi in London is comparatively safer than a taxi in Mexico. Why? Primarily due to increased licensing and checks imposed on drivers in London, but also because of the operating environment and level of policing.

Rideshare: Popular apps such as Uber and
Lyftprovide a rideshare capability operating in most cities around the world.  Ridesharing has become increasingly popular because it is more affordable and sometimes more accessible in comparison to other transportation options.  Read this article Rideshares are not as safe as you might think if you are concerned about your travel options abroad.

Duty of Care and Journey Management:

An organization sending employees, students, or volunteers abroad has a legal and moral duty of care for their personal safety. Transporting employees through ridesharing companies and/or unregulated taxis increases the level of risk for the employees and heightens the corporate liability of employers.

If you are unsure, Seek Advice:

You should consider seeking advice fromonline travel safety trainingif you intend to travel through complicated environments to ensure you maximize your personal security.  Incorporating secure transportation into your travel risk management plan will also provide you that extra level of security and will help to take away the stress that comes with transiting abroad.

Travel Safety Training

Explore Secure to learn more about improving your travel risk management. Our eLearning courses are designed by security professionals with extensive experience inpersonal safetyand surviving in challenging environments.
January 07

a private analysis of infos

a private matter
November 27

Learn How To Robust Travel Risk Management Program

Opportunistic crimes such as pick-pocketing and other thefts are common in major Russian cities. This Travel Risk Management includes theft from hotel rooms and theft from vehicles. Cases are well-documented of visitors whose drinks were spiked at bars for the purpose of robbery, rape or other violence.

November 05

How Safe Is It To Travel To Russia For The 2018 Fifa World Cup?


Darren Aldrich is the Chief Operating Officer of ETS Risk Management, Inc., a global provider of travel security, Travel Risk Management, executive protection, threat intelligence and major event security. Frank is the former FBI Assistant Director of Counterintelligence, and recent head of Investigations, Special Event Security and Workplace Violence Prevention for General Electric.


September 26

Female Travel Safety Training | Explore Secure

Travel safety and security Female travelers can adapt and minimize the chances of encountering threats. This is the underlying principle of . Identify the threat or danger early and prepare accordingly so as to minimize the risk. The trick is not to avoid travel, but simply to prepare and adapt to traveling as a female to maximize safety.



May 13

Travel Security Risk Management | ETS Risk Management


Frank Figliuzzi is the Chief Operating Officer of ETS Risk Management, Inc., a global provider of travel security, Travel Risk Management, executive protection, threat intelligence and major event security. Frank is the former FBI Assistant Director of Counterintelligence, and recent head of Investigations, Special Event Security and Workplace Violence Prevention for General Electric.


How safe is it to visit Russia?


Virtually no travel to Russia is without risk.  Russia travel risk assessment is driven by three factors:


  1. Location specific inherent risks;
  2. The nature of the travel;
  3. and, The individual traveller.


For example, hate crimes against foreigners, minorities, and the LGBT community occur in Russia because of an apparent tolerance for such conduct as reflected in weak legislative prohibitions and an unwillingness to prosecute. Deadly terror attacks happen in Moscow, the north Caucasus and, most recently, St. Petersburg because of long-standing organic ethnic, religious and regional strife such as the Chechen/Russian conflict including possible sympathies for ISIS within the Chechen region.


Travel Risk Management


Travel in connection with special events or sporting matches raises the already well documented daily risk of tourists targeted by pickpockets and muggers, often by organized gangs in major cities. Individual travellers of Asian or Afro-Caribbean descent or who simply “don’t look like they belong” in the eyes of certain locals should exercise particularly enhanced vigilance.


Business travellers should understand that electronic devices are frequently targeted for intrusion via malware and other means in an attempt by the Russian intelligence services to access proprietary corporate information for a competitive edge.


Despite the inherent risks, travellers who make the effort to seek the “ground truth” of their destination through their own government alerts, reading current country risk profiles offered by established security firms, and who maintain vigilance and a low-profile, can easily mitigate the risks and enjoy a memorable trip to a vast and proud nation.


How safe will it be to go to the World Cup?


Travelers to the World Cup are advised of the significant risk posed by organized hooligans who seek to engage in brutal fights with opposing fans from countries like Britain, France and other nations.


Russian hooliganism is marked by elements distinct from traditional hooliganism in the UK and Europe. Law enforcement agencies with decades of experience in securing soccer competitions have documented observations of Russian thugs who are highly trained and prepared to fight. These hooligans physically train in body-building and fight techniques and they make a point of not drinking alcohol during matches to maintain an advantage over their UK or European counterparts.


Disturbingly, Russian government leaders seemingly encourage such behaviour with Russian Ministers quoted saying “Keep up the good work”, and Putin himself observing how Russian fans had quite literally beaten the English fans.


However, a major world event such as the World Cup is likely to be secured by the highest level of Russian national security agencies who understand the negative impact globally of any major incident during the World Cup.  The largely incident-free Winter Olympics in Sochi, even under threat of terrorism, is evidence that Russian can secure a major event when it chooses.


What are the biggest risks?


Opportunistic crimes such as pick-pocketing and other thefts are common in major Russian cities. This risk includes theft from hotel rooms and theft from vehicles. Cases are well-documented of visitors whose drinks were spiked at bars for the purpose of robbery, rape or other violence. Unconscious victims are often left outside sometimes with life-threatening implications especially in the cold winter months. Further reports exist of criminals impersonating police officers for the purpose of harassing and robbing tourists.


What are the overlooked risks?


Travellers to Russia often overlook or dismiss the reality that the Russian government is in near total control of infrastructure which facilitates intelligence service targeting of western business and government travellers to include remote intrusion into their devices, or, even outright theft of their laptops, smart phones and other devices.


Similarly, hotel frequented by western travellers are particularly notorious for intelligence collection, entrapment and attempts to compromise western business and government visitors. This fact poses a dilemma for travellers seeking to avoid such targeting by possibly choosing a local, non-westernized hotel.


However, such a choice often increases the odds of opportunistic crimes such as theft or assault and can antagonize the intelligence services who may become perturbed by your diversion from the usual hotel chains.


How should people mitigate this?


Risk mitigation remains similar to advice given for most international travel.


Specifically, avoid open display of wealth, including expensive jewellery, and anything that may identify you as a tourist. Avoid walking alone at night. Be vigilant for pickpockets in main tourist areas and around the main railway stations, and keep your passport tightly secured. Always buy your own drinks at the bar and keep them in sight at all times.


To mitigate the risk of being victimized by “fake” police officers, always insist on seeing identification if you are stopped.


What duty of care provisions should employers sending staff to Russia have in place? What should employees ask for?


Business leaders sending employees to Russia are advised to include professional risk managementmeasures into the travel plan.


These measures should include physical security guidance, protection of intellectual property, and potential medical consultation and even evacuation. The addition of enhanced security enables your team to focus on business objectives within minimal constraints or distractions.  Employees should ask for loaner devices to take that contain only the data needed for that trip and bring a reliable communication device.


Employees traveling for lengthy periods, particularly to more remote areas of Russia, should understand that the local hospital blood supply may not be screened for HIV and other diseases as is the standard in the US, UK and other nations. Therefore, employees should ask about medical evacuation plans in the event of an unexpected need for surgery.


May 06

Expert Advice: Is It Safe To Go To Russia And To Attend The World Cup? | ETS Risk Management

Frank Figliuzzi is the Chief Operating Officer of ETS Risk Management, Inc., a global provider of travel security, Travel Risk Management, executive protection, threat intelligence and major event security. Frank is the former FBI Assistant Director of Counterintelligence and recent head of Investigations, Special Event Security and Workplace Violence Prevention for General Electric.

How safe is it to visit Russia?

Virtually no travel to Russia is without risk. Russia travel risk assessment is driven by three factors:

1. Location specific inherent risks;

2. The nature of the travel;

3. And, the individual traveller.

For example, hate crimes against foreigners, minorities, and the LGBT community occur in Russia because of an apparent tolerance for such conduct as reflected in weak legislative prohibitions and an unwillingness to prosecute. Deadly terror attacks happen in Moscow, the north Caucasus and, most recently, St. Petersburg because of long-standing organic ethnic, religious and regional strife such as the Chechen/Russian conflict including possible sympathies for ISIS within the Chechen region.

Travel in connection with special events or sporting matches raises the already well documented daily risk of tourists targeted by pickpockets and muggers, often by organized gangs in major cities. Individual travellers of Asian or Afro-Caribbean descent or who simply “don’t look like they belong” in the eyes of certain locals should exercise particularly enhanced vigilance.

Business travellers should understand that electronic devices are frequently targeted for intrusion via malware and other means in an attempt by the Russian intelligence services to access proprietary corporate information for a competitive edge.

Despite the inherent risks, travellers who make the effort to seek the “ground truth” of their destination through their own government alerts, reading current country risk profiles offered by established security firms, and who maintain vigilance and a low-profile, can easily mitigate the risks and enjoy a memorable trip to a vast and proud nation.

How safe will it be to go to the World Cup?

Travelers to the World Cup are advised of the significant risk posed by organized hooligans who seek to engage in brutal fights with opposing fans from countries like Britain, France and other nations.

Russian hooliganism is marked by elements distinct from traditional hooliganism in the UK and Europe. Law enforcement agencies with decades of experience in securing soccer competitions have documented observations of Russian thugs who are highly trained and prepared to fight. These hooligans physically train in body-building and fight techniques and they make a point of not drinking alcohol during matches to maintain an advantage over their UK or European counterparts.

Disturbingly, Russian government leaders seemingly encourage such behaviour with Russian Ministers quoted saying “Keep up the good work”, and Putin himself observing how Russian fans had quite literally beaten the English fans.

However, a major world event such as the World Cup is likely to be secured by the highest level of Russian national security agencies who understand the negative impact globally of any major incident during the World Cup. The largely incident-free Winter Olympics in Sochi, even under threat of terrorism, is evidence that Russian can secure a major event when it chooses.

What are the biggest risks?

Opportunistic crimes such as pick-pocketing and other thefts are common in major Russian cities. This risk includes theft from hotel rooms and theft from vehicles. Cases are well-documented of visitors whose drinks were spiked at bars for the purpose of robbery, rape or other violence. Unconscious victims are often left outside sometimes with life-threatening implications especially in the cold winter months. Further reports exist of criminals impersonating police officers for the purpose of harassing and robbing tourists.

What are the overlooked risks?

Travellers to Russia often overlook or dismiss the reality that the Russian government is in near total control of infrastructure which facilitates intelligence service targeting of western business and government travellers to include remote intrusion into their devices, or, even outright theft of their laptops, smart phones and other devices.

Similarly, hotel frequented by western travellers are particularly notorious for intelligence collection, entrapment and attempts to compromise western business and government visitors. This fact poses a dilemma for travellers seeking to avoid such targeting by possibly choosing a local, non-westernized hotel.

However, such a choice often increases the odds of opportunistic crimes such as theft or assault and can antagonize the intelligence services who may become perturbed by your diversion from the usual hotel chains.

How should people mitigate this?

Risk mitigation remains similar to advice given for most international travel.

Specifically, avoid open display of wealth, including expensive jewellery, and anything that may identify you as a tourist. Avoid walking alone at night. Be vigilant for pickpockets in main tourist areas and around the main railway stations, and keep your passport tightly secured. Always buy your own drinks at the bar and keep them in sight at all times.

To mitigate the risk of being victimized by “fake” police officers, always insist on seeing identification if you are stopped.

What duty of care provisions should employers sending staff to Russia have in place? What should employees ask for?

Business leaders sending employees to Russia are advised to include professional risk management measures into the travel plan.

These measures should include physical security guidance, protection of intellectual property, and potential medical consultation and even evacuation. The addition of enhanced security enables your team to focus on business objectives within minimal constraints or distractions. Employees should ask for loaner devices to take that contain only the data needed for that trip and bring a reliable communication device.

Employees traveling for lengthy periods, particularly to more remote areas of Russia, should understand that the local hospital blood supply may not be screened for HIV and other diseases as is the standard in the US, UK and other nations. Therefore, employees should ask about medical evacuation plans in the event of an unexpected need for surgery.

Read Full article on https://duspacollective.org/expert-advice-is-it-safe-to-go-to-russia-and-to-attend-the-world-cup-2/


April 10

Expert Advice: Is It Safe To Go To Russia And To Attend The World Cup? | ETS Risk Management

Frank Figliuzzi is the Chief Operating Officer of ETS Risk Management, Inc., a global provider of travel security, Travel Risk Management, executive protection, threat intelligence and major event security. Frank is the former FBI Assistant Director of Counterintelligence, and recent head of Investigations, Special Event Security and Workplace Violence Prevention for General Electric.

How safe is it to visit Russia?

Virtually no travel to Russia is without risk.  Russia travel risk assessment is driven by three factors:

  1. Location specific inherent risks;
  2. The nature of the travel;
  3. and, The individual traveller.


Travel Risk Management


For example, hate crimes against foreigners, minorities, and the LGBT community occur in Russia because of an apparent tolerance for such conduct as reflected in weak legislative prohibitions and an unwillingness to prosecute. Deadly terror attacks happen in Moscow, the north Caucasus and, most recently, St. Petersburg because of long-standing organic ethnic, religious and regional strife such as the Chechen/Russian conflict including possible sympathies for ISIS within the Chechen region.

Travel in connection with special events or sporting matches raises the already well documented daily risk of tourists targeted by pickpockets and muggers, often by organized gangs in major cities. Individual travellers of Asian or Afro-Caribbean descent or who simply “don’t look like they belong” in the eyes of certain locals should exercise particularly enhanced vigilance.

Business travellers should understand that electronic devices are frequently targeted for intrusion via malware and other means in an attempt by the Russian intelligence services to access proprietary corporate information for a competitive edge.

Despite the inherent risks, travellers who make the effort to seek the “ground truth” of their destination through their own government alerts, reading current country risk profiles offered by established security firms, and who maintain vigilance and a low-profile, can easily mitigate the risks and enjoy a memorable trip to a vast and proud nation.

How safe will it be to go to the World Cup?

Travelers to the World Cup are advised of the significant risk posed by organized hooligans who seek to engage in brutal fights with opposing fans from countries like Britain, France and other nations.

Russian hooliganism is marked by elements distinct from traditional hooliganism in the UK and Europe. Law enforcement agencies with decades of experience in securing soccer competitions have documented observations of Russian thugs who are highly trained and prepared to fight. These hooligans physically train in body-building and fight techniques and they make a point of not drinking alcohol during matches to maintain an advantage over their UK or European counterparts.

Disturbingly, Russian government leaders seemingly encourage such behaviour with Russian Ministers quoted saying “Keep up the good work”, and Putin himself observing how Russian fans had quite literally beaten the English fans.

However, a major world event such as the World Cup is likely to be secured by the highest level of Russian national security agencies who understand the negative impact globally of any major incident during the World Cup.  The largely incident-free Winter Olympics in Sochi, even under threat of terrorism, is evidence that Russian can secure a major event when it chooses.

What are the biggest risks?

Opportunistic crimes such as pick-pocketing and other thefts are common in major Russian cities. This risk includes theft from hotel rooms and theft from vehicles. Cases are well-documented of visitors whose drinks were spiked at bars for the purpose of robbery, rape or other violence. Unconscious victims are often left outside sometimes with life-threatening implications especially in the cold winter months. Further reports exist of criminals impersonating police officers for the purpose of harassing and robbing tourists.

What are the overlooked risks?

Travellers to Russia often overlook or dismiss the reality that the Russian government is in near total control of infrastructure which facilitates intelligence service targeting of western business and government travellers to include remote intrusion into their devices, or, even outright theft of their laptops, smart phones and other devices.

Similarly, hotel frequented by western travellers are particularly notorious for intelligence collection, entrapment and attempts to compromise western business and government visitors. This fact poses a dilemma for travellers seeking to avoid such targeting by possibly choosing a local, non-westernized hotel.

However, such a choice often increases the odds of opportunistic crimes such as theft or assault and can antagonize the intelligence services who may become perturbed by your diversion from the usual hotel chains.

How should people mitigate this?

Risk mitigation remains similar to advice given for most international travel.

Specifically, avoid open display of wealth, including expensive jewellery, and anything that may identify you as a tourist. Avoid walking alone at night. Be vigilant for pickpockets in main tourist areas and around the main railway stations, and keep your passport tightly secured. Always buy your own drinks at the bar and keep them in sight at all times.

To mitigate the risk of being victimized by “fake” police officers, always insist on seeing identification if you are stopped.

What duty of care provisions should employers sending staff to Russia have in place? What should employees ask for?

Business leaders sending employees to Russia are advised to include professional risk management measures into the travel plan.

These measures should include physical security guidance, protection of intellectual property, and potential medical consultation and even evacuation. The addition of enhanced security enables your team to focus on business objectives within minimal constraints or distractions.  Employees should ask for loaner devices to take that contain only the data needed for that trip and bring a reliable communication device.

Employees traveling for lengthy periods, particularly to more remote areas of Russia, should understand that the local hospital blood supply may not be screened for HIV and other diseases as is the standard in the US, UK and other nations. Therefore, employees should ask about medical evacuation plans in the event of an unexpected need for surgery.

Read Full article on http://www.safetravelsmagazine.com/2018/03/26/expert-advice-is-it-safe-to-go-to-russia-and-to-attend-the-world-cup/

March 28

Travel Tracking Risk Management Security Services - ETS

The Five Key Components Of A Robust Travel Risk Ma [...]

Travel Risk Management

The Five Key Components of a Robust Travel Risk Management Program

Meeting duty of care requirements is a complex process to navigate for any organization with employees who are traveling overseas on company business. Understanding what measures one can take to manage risk to an acceptable standard remains a considerable challenge. Now, more than ever in our volatile world the question arises, how best to meet this legal obligation?

The GEBIR principal identifies the five key components of a Travel Risk Management (TRM) program:

Security risk reports provide the organization a comprehensive understanding of what we refer to as ‘Ground Truth’ – knowing the risks of the area of operations – country, region and locale. It is vital to obtain a comprehensive threat overview of all international locations where travel will be conducted within. Accurate risk assessments and country security risk reports will provide for a more informed and balanced decision making capability regarding operational security concerns.

Provide personnel the tools and knowledge to minimize and mitigate personal travel risk. Travel safety and situational awareness is a vital cog in the TRM machine. Risks can be significantly reduced with the sensible application of basic personal security methodology. It is often the most cost-effective and efficient method of significantly improving the safety of individuals or groups abroad. Any training should provide an auditable trail that personnel completed the necessary steps prior to departure to minimize the risk of litigation.

Prior to any travel the individual traveling should be fully aware and conversant with the environment they will be visiting, as well as the threats and risk of those threats.  To avoid the risk of litigation it is vital that any individual’s travel goes ahead willingly and with ‘eyes wide open’. To ensure this, any organization should supply, or provide access to a country briefing to an individual or group prior to departure.

The provision of the necessary protective and personal safety support when your travelers are in-country should involve, but not be limited to, two categories:

Ground Transportation – The biggest risk to any traveler in a foreign country is vehicular accident. Further, most robberies, abductions and violent opportunistic crime occurs in or near a vehicle. It is therefore essential that journey management plans are prepared and rigorously enforced.

Security – In some countries, the use of Executive Protection may be required to manage individual and group security. Executive protection is no longer a service for the rich and famous. The Modern professional ‘bodyguard’ acts in an enabling role, facilitating the movement of executives through the plethora of risks that exist.

If an emergency incident occurs police and national emergency medical services are often inadequate, overwhelmed, or non-existent. There must be a pre-identified and rehearsed service in place to ensure the effective and timely response to an emergency.

There are 3 components to Response:

Communication – The benchmark is to be able to identify the exact location of your employees and be able to effectively communicate with them within 15-20 minutes of an incident occurring. Tracking and monitoring through GSM is an effective tool.

Crisis Management – Being able to react immediately and effectively. This requires the design and implementation of plans and processes, to be complemented by the introduction and training of a crisis management team. 

Emergency Evacuation/Hibernation Plans – These should be a structured and practical guide for the organization to identify and respond to executing a full or partial evacuation of personnel from operational locations, or hibernate in-situ until the situation changes.

Contact us to arrange a free travel risk management consultation.